Life in East Durham~ Churches, Schools and Parks

Life in East Durham~ Churches, Schools and Parks


Before East Durham was annexed as part of Durham proper, it truly existed as it's own little mill town, and residents had little reason to venture out to other neighborhoods. The neighborhood was alive with activity. Prior to Holton being built, that field was a ballpark where the Durham Bulls first played. People would take the trolley from all over town to watch not only Bulls games, but also games played between mill and factory workers from around town. The factories even got involved in residents' religious lives. Both Carr UMC and Angier Avenue Baptist started out of Durham Cotton Manufacturing, as did the area schools. As the neighborhood grew, wooden schools were replaced by new brick schools, although they still remained separate and definitely not equal. Additional churches were built as more people moved to the neighborhood. In the present, neighborhood churches and schools remain to be community meeting place for residents.

edgemontpark_071860.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_1/childrenplayingatlongmeadow_061755.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_1/longmeadowaerial_1959.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_1/sunrisesvclongmeadowpark_04156.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_1/LongMeadowPool_011511.jpg

LONG MEADOW PARK

917
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1932
Neighborhood: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sun, 02/12/2012 - 2:32pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 36.672" N, 78° 53' 1.824" W

Comments

917
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1932
Neighborhood: 
,
Type: 
Use: 

 

edgemontpark_071860.jpg

07.18.60


"Children Playing at Long Meadow, 06.17.55"
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

Long Meadow Park was established in 1932 through the donation of land by John Sprunt Hill to the City of Durham; the park was initially segregated, accessible only to whites. East End Park was established at the same time (also donated by Hill) one block to the north as a parallel facility for African-Americans.

In 1937, the Works Progress Administration helped to fund the construction of a pool at Long Meadow Park.


Aerial view of Long Meadow Park, 1959.


"Sunrise Service at Long Meadow Park" - 04.01.56 - looking southwest.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

I don't know when the city parks were desegregated. As detailed previously, the neighborhood demographics changed considerably in the 1960s as African-Americans displaced from Hayti moved into the formerly predominantly white neighborhood. White flight ensued.

After falling into some disrepair by the 1990s, the park became the focus of significant renovation in the early 2000s, which has included two very nice baseball diamonds donated by the Durham Bulls for Little League, and a 0,000 renovation by the city, which included new play equipment, renovated basketball courts, and a serious upgrade for the swimming pool (I think it has a water slide.) Goose Creek was also 'renovated' in much the same way Third Fork Creek was through Forest Hills - with the creation of a more natural riparian buffer with grasses, etc. Although I understand the reasoning behind this, it did eliminate a very attractive set of granite walls and detailing that lined the course of the creek through Long Meadow.

The sum of these renovations - particularly when paired with the facilities at East End Park one block away - are some of the nicest park facilities / greatest quantity of park amenities in the city.


Long Meadow pool, 01.15.11


Goose Creek, 01.15.11


Baseball diamonds, 01.15.11

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35.99352,-78.88384

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/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/hollowaystreetschool.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2014_4/Screen%20shot%202014-05-05%20at%204_09_21%20PM.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2014_4/Screen%20shot%202014-05-05%20at%204_10_14%20PM.jpgHollowayStSchool_class_1957.jpgPromotion Certificate.jpg

HOLLOWAY STREET SCHOOL

1107
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1928
/ Modified in
1950
,
1954
,
1975
,
2016
Architect/Designers: 
,
,
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

The Holloway Street school was built in 1928, designed by Durham architects Rose and Rose. Rear wings were added to the school in 1950 and 1954. A gymnasium was added in 1975.

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  • Fri, 06/24/2016 - 9:04pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 41.6976" N, 78° 52' 52.8276" W

Comments

1107
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1928
/ Modified in
1950
,
1954
,
1975
,
2016
Architect/Designers: 
,
,
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 


Holloway Street School, 1950s.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

The Holloway Street school was built in 1928, designed by Durham architects Rose and Rose. Rear wings were added to the school in 1950 and 1954. A gymnasium was added in 1975.

1937 Sanborn, showing the original footprint of the school

1950 Sanborn Map, showing the 1950 addition.

I can find little to no information about the school in books or public records; I'll ask that any alums or knowledgeable folks out there chime in with information about the school.

Barbara Warren Loftin sent the following picture of her graduating class of May 31, 1957. 

HollowayStSchool_class_1957.jpg

She gave the names of her graduating class as:

 

Bagley, Walter

Billings, William

Bradley, Thomas

Goldston, John

Lumsden, Richard

Mobley, Reid

Mumford, Hal

Onufrak, Billy

Poole, Michael

Scoggins, Michael

Tyndall, Roy

Wiggins, Richard

Winston, Sammy

 

Dodson, Patricia

Fetterman, Brenda

Fisher, Pat

Goss, Sylvia

Hamilton, Lynn

Johns, Norma J

Leffers, Carol

Maynard, Gloria

Moore, Sandra

Morris, Carol

Oakley, Carol

Rich, Ilene

Truelove, Delores

 

Promotion Certificate.jpg

I'm unsure of when it closed. My best guess would be mid-1990s, and that it was replaced by Eastway Elementary.

In 2000, Durham Public Schools offered the building to Durham County for 8,000; the county declined. In October 2001, the Durham Public Schools sold the building to "Techno Complex, LLC" - hard to deduce the purchase price from the deeds, as it's revenue-stamp exempt. It appears to have been used / is being leased by various community non-profit / training / church type tenants - the building was for sale in ~2008-9, but the listing appears to have expired.

hollowaystreetschool_100210.jpg
Former Holloway Street School, 10.02.10 (G. Kueber)

05.05.14 (G. Kueber)

 

05.05.14 (G. Kueber)

 

05.05.14 (G. Kueber)

 

05.05.14 (G. Kueber)

 

05.05.14 (G. Kueber)

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314 N. HYDE PARK AVE. - PENTACOSTAL HOLINESS

314
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1940
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Wed, 04/17/2013 - 8:25am by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 19.284" N, 78° 52' 53.5728" W
US

Comments

314
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1940
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

(Below in italics is from the 2004 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Pentecostal Holiness Church. Front-gabled brick sanctuary, 1 bay wide and 7 bays deep, with a Gothic arched entrance and an octagonal stained glass window in the upper facade. Side windows have stained glass sashes. Flanking 1-story wings are apparently original. 1940-1960 CDs: Pentecostal Holiness Church.

This has since been occupied by Interfaith Outreach ministries, and as of 2013 is occupied by "No Greater Love Christian Outreach."

NC Education Building. Ca. 1970. 2-story flat-roofed brick building with a wide decorative brick entrance surround and metal casement windows.

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1801 EAST MAIN STREET - ADVENT CHRISTIAN CHURCH

1801
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1920-1925
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Mon, 06/17/2013 - 12:39pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 8.088" N, 78° 52' 53.904" W

Comments

1801
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1920-1925
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

One of my favorite small church structures in Durham, the building at 1801 East Main Street originally housed the Advent Christian Church. It was built in the early 1920s, and is the only church of that vintage still standing in East Durham.

By 1944, it housed the "House of Prayer," which remained here at least through the 1960s. It currently houses the Good Shepherd Church of God in Christ.

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.

Former Advent Christian Church. Simple gable-front church, 3 bays wide and 6 bays deep, with a patterned tin shingle roof, exposed rafter tails, decorative eave brackets, and a large multi-panel lunette above the double doors in the narrow projecting entrance bay. Lancet windows with 4-over-4 sashes. This is the only intact early 20th century frame church in East Durham. [Roberts, Durham A&HI] 1925-1940 CDs: Advent Christian Church. 1945: The House of Prayer. 1937 SM.

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EAST DURHAM JUNIOR HIGH / HOLTON SCHOOL / HOLTON CENTER

401
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1939
/ Modified in
1950
,
2009
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Thu, 10/11/2012 - 8:18am by gary

Location

35° 59' 21.9912" N, 78° 52' 43.806" W

Comments

401
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1939
/ Modified in
1950
,
2009
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

 


Bulls at the East Durham Ballpark, 1913.
From "Baseball's Hometown Teams: The Story of the Minor Leagues" by Bruce Chadwick

By 1901 several local businessmen affiliated with the Durham Athletic Association attempted to pull together a team to play in the Virginia-Carolina league (or perhaps the Class C North Carolina League.) It seems that by 1902, a "Durham Bulls" team was established. The Durham Bulls' website inconsistently refers to this early team as the "Tobacconists" or the Bulls. The team evidently played on the Trinity College field - at the north end of what is now Duke's East Campus. The team had disappeared again by July of that same year.

In 1909 the Durham Traction Company built a baseball field on North Driver Street. Special streetcars would take people out the East Durham route - down E. Main to Angier, east on Angier to S. Driver, north on Driver to the ballpark. (The streetcar then continued north to Holloway, and west on Holloway to Mangum.) By 1910, a Durham city baseball league was established, with teams from the Durham Hosiery Mill No.1, the YMCA, East Durham, and West Durham.

In 1913, a more successful attempt to establish professional baseball in Durham was undertaken. That year, the North Carolina League was re-formed, and the local team was again named the "Durham Bulls" - a Class D farm team for the Cincinnati Reds. The Bulls played in the East Durham ballpark as well.


Sanborn Map of East Durham, showing the East Durham ballpark at N. Driver and West (now Taylor) Sts., 1913.

The games were interrupted for World War I, and then the league disbanded.

The Piedmont League was established in 1919, and the Bulls were one of the members. The Bulls were successful, and in 1926, private funds were raised to build a new ballpark for the club closer to downtown, on open land near Corporation and Morris Streets, known as El Toro Ballpark. The baseball field on North Driver was abandoned by the Bulls, but is still noted as an "athletic field" on the 1937 Sanborn maps (the bleachers appear to have disappeared.)


1920s photo, looking south on North Driver Street from near Southgate Street, with the overgrown edge of the ballpark site on the right.

In 1939, the Durham Public Schools built a new Junior High School on the baseball field site: East Durham Junior High. In 1950, a new gymnasium was added to the north end of the originally-L-shaped structure


Looking southwest from North Driver Street, 1950s. The newer gymnasium is in the foreground, set back from the original facade.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)


Bird's Eye view, looking northeast, 1950s.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)


East Durham Junior High, 01.19.55
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

East Durham Junior High became the Holton Middle School at some point in the early 1960s, although it appears to have gone interchangeably by East Durham Junior High, Holton Junior High, and Holton Middle School for a number of years. It remained a middle school until 1992, when it closed after the city-county school merger. The Communities in Schools Academy operated out the the building until 2002.

The future of the school building was uncertain at that point, but kudos to local government and Duke for having the vision to adaptively reuse the existing structure to create a community center that now anchors this end of Driver Street - as the baseball field once did.

It was renovated beginning in July 2008 with completion in August 2009 through a partnership between the city, the county, Durham Public Schools, and Duke University Health System.


01.01.09

The .7 million renovation rebranded the school as the "Holton Career and Resource Center," which includes a neighborhood clinic and 'wellness center'. The city's Parks and Recreation Department is housed on the second floor, and the Durham Public Schools houses vocational training programs in the building. Durham Parks and Rec also hosts after-school, summer camp, and other community programs in the building. The center opened in August 2009.


Former East Durham Junior High / Holton Career and Resource Center, 10.02.10

All-in-all, this is a stupendous example of adaptive reuse - a model that the county could have followed for the Lowes Grove School as well.

++++

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

East Durham Junior High School. Art Moderne-style 2-story brick school that occupies the entire block along Driver St. between Taylor and Southgate streets on the sides and Maple St. on the rear. The original building consists of a 3-bay entrance pavilion with a stone facing, flanked by 8 bay brick elevations. The building rests on a raised basement. Brick is 1-to-5 common bond. The recessed entrance has a pilastered surround. The stepped entrance parapet is inscribed "East Durham Junior High School."  Rows of triple windows, with flanking single windows, illuminate the clasrooms. These are replacement metal windows with transoms. About 1950, a 2-story auditorium addition was added on the south side. It closely follows the design of the original building, with a stone Art Moderne entrance bay. It retains 6-over-6 wood sash wndows. On the north side is a 1-story gymnasium addition of brick, with metal casement windows. The final addition is an International Style concrete and glass cafeteria, constructed to the rear about 1980. This striking addition is supported on concrete piers, with a heavy concrete framework enclosed with large galss bays. Until 1935 this was the Durham Baseball Park. 1940 CD:East Durham Jr Hi School. The school, still owned by the Durham School system, operated as the CIS Academy until it closed in the 1990s.

 

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.989442,-78.878835

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CARR UNITED METHODIST - 107 N. DRIVER STREET

107
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1925-1949
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 07/30/2011 - 3:18pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 10.8564" N, 78° 52' 42.492" W

Comments

107
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1925-1949
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


North Driver and East Main Street, looking north, 1946. Carr United Methodist is partly visible on the left, before the completion of the sanctuary in 1949.
(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)

Carr United Methodist church began out of the establishment of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company in East Durham. Julian Carr, who, along with the Dukes was a lifelong Methodist, provided the funds to establish the church on the north side of the railroad tracks, across from the factory. The first structure was a frame building located at the northeast corner of Clay (then called Watts) and Peabody Streets.

At a quarterly conference at Trinity Church in 1885, the main topic of discussion was church expansion - to reach out to the people of the eastern and western parts of Durham. At that time, a building committee for the eastern section was appointed including: Julian S. Carr, chairman, E. J. Parrish, Rev. Alexander Walker, J. C. Angier, James Southgate, J. B. Walker, T. B. Smith, H. N. Snow, T. D. Jones, J. M. Odell, Washington Duke, and W. H. Branson. They obtained permission to hold services on the fourth floor of the East Durham Cotton Mill on E. Pettigrew Street until a church could be built. At the annual conference held in Durham in 1885, the Rev. W. S. Black was named presiding elder and the Rev. Amos Gregson, a local lay pastor was appointed pastor of the East End and West End churches. On July 22, 1886, Gregson reported to the District Conference: "The religious services of East Durham are held in the factory of the Durham Cotton Mfg. Co. At this place we have organized a church of twelve members and have a Sunday School numbering one hundred officers, teachers, and scholars. We expect soon to begin the erection of a house of worship which when finished will cost about ,000." The site for the first church, a lot of about 3/4 acres, was purchased from Mr. Grey Barbee for the sum of 0. This lot was located directly across the railroad from the mill on the southeast corner of Clay and Peabody Streets. The cornerstone of the church was laid on August 26, 1886. This date is now accepted as the birthday of Carr Methodist Church. The church was named for General Julian S. Carr, a member of the building committee, who on many occasions made liberal donations to the building fund and other needs of the church. The charter members of the church were: A. E. Brewer, Mariah Brewer, J. P. Hornbuckle, Susan S. Hornbuckle, Lela P.
Faucette, Richard F. Hornbuckle, James R. Cole, Smanthy B. Cole, Ira Mayton, A. M. Culberson, Alice W. Faucette, Laura B. Faucette, and Amos Gregson, pastor. The officers of the Sunday School were: W. H. Branson, Superintendent, E. C. Barnhardt, Secretary. Teachers were: J. R. Cole, J. P. Hornbuckle, E. W. Hayes, T. J. W. Brown, Jennie P. McLeod, Mrs. Clara Branson, Mary Geans, Nettie Wilson, Annie Lloyd, E. W. Worth, Jennie Cox, and H. C. Kirk - a total of 14. There were 114 scholars on roll. The first couple married in the church were Mr. and Mrs. T. J. W. Brown.

The first structure was only one room and was used until 1908, when a wing was built on the west side and called the Sunday School unit. This was closed off from the main room by sliding doors which could be opened and used during the worship service.

In 1916, it became evident more room was needed. Since the town was growing to the north, the trustees decided to try to secure a building site in a more centralized location. They bargained for a lot on the corner of E. Main and Driver Streets, known as the T. B. Smith property. At this time, conditions became uncertain due to World War I, so it was decided to take the money available and add a two story annex to the present building. It was added to the north side of the main room, completed in 1917 and used for 15 years.

In 1925, three houses burned on Driver Avenue near E. Main Street. The trustees secured these lots along with land purchased from Mr. H. A. Jones for a total of ,800. This amount was paid in one year. These lots provided space for the new church and parsonage.

The congregation built the new church in stages over the period of 1925-1949. It appears that the original church was demolished in 1932 (although the original Parsonage stood until relatively recently.)

A building fund was started under the leadership of Rev. J. H. Buffaloe and Mr. J. B. Simpson was named treasurer. The fund grew until there was a total of ,426 in the treasury. In 1930, the new parsonage was built at a cost of ,186, leaving a balance of ,240. With this plus ,500 which had to be borrowed, the educational unit was built. This was a three story brick building. Worship services were held in the auditorium on the ground floor. The pastor's study, office, and classrooms were on the second level and there were classrooms on the third floor. Rev. J. A. Russell was pastor at this time. He and his family were the first occupants of the new parsonage.

Rev. M. C. Dunn was appointed to Carr in 1941. The membership of the church at that time was 620 with ,972.81 in the building fund. Under Mr. Dunn's leadership, a program was launched to raise the necessary money for the new sanctuary. It was estimated at this time that ,000 would build the new addition but it soon became evident that this was far too small an amount. Actual construction of the sanctuary was begun in 1947 and completed in 1949, at the cost of 9,633. Rev. Dunn remained pastor for 11 years during which time the membership increased to 900. This figure reflects the activity that marked the decade of the 1940's and early 1950's - World War II era. This was a period of great activity on the part of the congregation. During this time, 5,000 was raised for the new sanctuary.

Some of the activities participated in during these years included: a Carr Church Newsletter for service men and women from the church and community, basketball teams, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts,art classes, the Community Players, a community library, a nursery and a playground.

Rev. T. J. Whitehead came as pastor in 1952. During his pastorate, the remaining debt was reduced to ,000. At the morning service on April 8, 1956, Mr. J. B. Simpson, the treasurer of the building fund since its beginning in 1930, had the privilege of handing to the pastor, Rev. H. B. Lewis, a check covering the last payment on the principal of indebtedness. On August 26, 1956, dedication services for the sanctuary were held with Paul M. Barber, Bishop; C. D. Barclift, District Superintendent; and H. B. Lewis, Pastor, presiding.

In September 1956, a loan of ,000 was made for the renovation of the education unit. A committee for long range planning was appointed and during this year the old auditorium on the ground floor of the education unit was divided to provide more space for the nursery and kindergarten classes. Also a committee was appointed for beautification of church grounds. This was to be an ongoing project.

On Christmas Day 1960, Rev. Carl A. Johnson, the pastor, answered his call of departure from this life. His death brought great grief. His brief ministry made a real impact on the church. Stepping in as interim pastor was Dr. H. E. Myers, retired professor from Duke Divinity School. He and his wife, "Mrs. Rosa", served with much love and understanding during their six month stay. Since the Myers family was living in their own home, it seemed an ideal time to complete a needed renovation of the parsonage.

In June 1961, Rev. W. A. Seawell was appointed to Carr. In 1962 the H. A. Jones property on the corner of Driver Avenue and
E. Main Street was purchased for ,000. The house was removed, a temporary parking lot replacing it. This lot was to be used until further beautification plans could be made. In April 1962, the H. W. Stallings property on the north side of the parsonage was purchased for a sum of ,500. The house was removed, the lot leveled, seeded, and used as an addition to the parsonage grounds. Later a redwood fence was installed around the parsonage property along with shrubbery in front of the fence. Also at this time wrought iron and brass rails were installed on the steps at the sanctuary entrance.

In October 1962, the Barbour property behind the church, on Cherry Grove Street was purchased for ,000. In May 1963, the Carpenter property on East Main Street bordering the parking lot was purchased for ,500. The rent from the two houses on these lots was used to help retire our loan.

A complete renovation program was adopted in 1965 for the whole church, setting up a priority list - each to be done as funds
became available. [...] It became evident a new organ was needed to replace the one that had been given in honor of Mrs. Nell Morris, teacher of the Friendly Bible Class (later renamed the Nell Morris Bible Class). An organ fund was established and in 1967 a new organ was purchased at a cost of ,000. These funds were given as memorials for Mrs. Morris who died April 5, 1966. As the old organ was given to honor "Miss Nell", the new one was in memory of this much loved lady.

Mrs. Henrietta Morris, who served for several years on the beautification committee prior to her death in July 1966, left a sizeable sum in a trust fund, the interest to be used for outside beautification and continuing maintenance. The beautification committee started working on the plans she had presented: the removal of the two houses on lots the church had purchased, paving the parking lot and planting shrubbery. In March 1968, the State Highway Commission, in order to extend the East-West Expressway, bought the East Durham Cemetery for the sum of ,850. The cemetery, given by the Barbee family, was owned jointly by Angier Avenue Baptist Church and Carr Methodist Church. The Highway Commission moved the graves to other cemeteries as designated by the families of the deceased. The money, ,925, the church received from this sale was used for building repairs.

In 1968, the Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church merged and became the United Methodist Church. At
this time the Women's Society of Christian Service became the United Methodist Women.

Under the leadership of Rev. L. J. Bridges in 1969, the members felt the need for spiritual growth and began making plans for study. At the June 1970 Conference, Rev. R. F. Bundy was appointed to Carr. Under his leadership in April 1971, planning was completed and the church participated in its first Lay Witness Mission. This gave a spiritual surge of increased participation on the part of many and gave new growth to the life of the church.

The Y. E. Smith Branch of the Durham City and County Library, housed in the educational building of the church for 25 years was officially closed as of August 31, 1972.

Both the church and the parsonage underwent considerable renovation in 1972. Various repairs were made throughout. Also, both buildings received paint, wallpaper and carpet. Through the estate of Mrs. Ida Baker, the church became the recipient of approximately ,000 endowment funds.

In 1973 the church voted to begin a bus ministry for those without transportation and by fall 1974, a bus had been purchased
and was in operation.


Carr United Methodist, 1980

During [1984] , the stained glass windows in the sanctuary were covered with Lexan, a material for the protection of the windows from outside damage. The entire church building was in need of a new roof [by 1985]. It was estimated that it would take approximately ,000 to get this work done and the money should be on hand by the time the work was started. By June 1, 1986, the entire amount had been raised, the money in the bank waiting for the completion of the work.

The course of East Durham over the subsequent 10 years was an interesting study in cohort effect; while neighborhoods such as Edgemont has fallen on hard times through the 1950s and 60s - and even harder times during the 70s and 80s - East Durham remained a reasonably stable community during those decades. The generation of people who had established their homes in East Durham during the first decades of the 20th century remained in place; their children, however, did not. As an entire generation of East Durham began to pass away during the 1980s and 1990s, property went on the market and was not desirable to homeowners - landlords began to buy up houses, subdivide them, and rent them cheaply. The demographics of East Durham changed dramatically over this period.

By the 2000s, Carr United Methodist was hanging on, but barely. In 2008, the congregation had waned from 1000 strong in the 1950s to ~12 members. The remaining members decided to shutter the church by 2010, when they "signed over" the buildings to Shepherd's House UMC, "a church composed mostly of immigrants from Zimbabwe that was already sharing space at Carr and successfully reaching out to the surrounding neighborhood," the the Durham News article from July 2010.


Former Carr United Methodist, current Shepherd's House UMC 10.02.10

(I've done something a bit different here; I've placed the information in the first 3 comments below, a copied section from the above quoted church pamphlet entitled "I Remember." Because the short comments reminded me so much of comments on these posts, I've placed them there rather than in the text of the post.)

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35.986349,-78.87847

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EAST DURHAM GRADED SCHOOL / YE SMITH SCHOOL

107
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1910
/ Modified in
1920
Architect/Designers: 
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 01/12/2013 - 9:02am by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 6.7596" N, 78° 52' 38.7048" W
US

Comments

107
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1910
/ Modified in
1920
Architect/Designers: 
Builders: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

----


East Durham Graded School, 1898
(Courtesy Duke Rare Book and Manuscript Collection)

The earliest schools in East Durham were two one-room schoolhouses - one, called the Cherry Grove School, was located near the present-day intersection of Liberty St. and North Driver St. The second was the Oak Grove School, located south of the railroad tracks on the later site of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company.

The first East Durham Graded School was built in the 1890s on South Driver Street, just south of East Main Street. The frame structure, pictured above. It contained 7 classrooms and an assembly hall. It was an 8 grade school with a 36 week term. In 1903-1904, the total enrollment was 337 students with an average daily attendance of 192 students. The building and grounds were valued that year at 00, and the school sat on an acre of land. LH Kincaid was principal, and the teachers were LW Cameron, Bettie Barber, Mary McIntosh, Bessie Proctor, and Zora Habel. Their salary was per month.

 

In 1905, a special tax election allowed the school to expand to a nine month term with five teachers paid per month; it had "one grade of high school"

In 1909-1910, the original school building was replaced by a new masonry brick structure, designed by Fred Githens of New York architectural firm Tilton and Githens. Githens also designed the West Durham Graded School No. 2, completed in 1912. The two schools bore a strong resemblance to one another. The new building was complete in time to be occupied during the 1909-1910 school year.


East Durham Graded School, 1910s.


Interior, 1910s

In 1913-14, the Graded School added 3 grades of high school, allowing students to graduate with a high school diploma - the average daily attendance was 421 students.


East Durham Graded School, 1913

 

East Durham_circa1915.jpg

Graded School class 1915. What struck me most about this picture? The feet.

In 1920, two wings were added to the rear of the school, extending it to the east. Likely at some point soon thereafter, the space between the wings was infilled with a gym / auditorium, although the gym, with its pitched roof, looks as if it could have been a separate structure from the main building - built between 1913 and 1920 - and connected to the main building by the flat-roofed wings in 1920.

In 1925, East Durham was annexed by the City of Durham. The East Durham Graded School then became known as the Y.E. Smith school, so named for the former chair of the school board. Thirteen students, the last to receive their high school diplomas from the school, graduated in 1925.


YE Smith School, 1926.

The school is noted as the East Durham Junior High School on the 1937 Sanborn Maps; because there is no other clear elementary school operating in East Durham during that period, my guess is that the school served as elementary and junior high, during the late 1920s-1930s, with students heading to Durham High School thereafter.

By the time the new East Durham Junior High was completed on North Driver Street in 1939, the school had become an elementary school, known as the East Durham Grammar School or the YE Smith School


1950 Sanborn map.


1950s view, looking northeast.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)


Bird's Eye view of Y.E. Smith, looking east, 1950s
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)


Bird's Eye view of Y.E. Smith, looking northwest, 1950s
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

In 1967, a new YE Smith elementary school was constructed several blocks farther to the east on East Main Street, and this structure was decommissioned as a regular school. It was repurposed as a school for handicapped children


Former Y.E. Smith School, 08.12.70
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

By 1980, the historic inventory notes that the building was being used by a "sheltered workshop operated by the Durham Exchange Club."

The Exchange Club continued to own the building until 1998, at which point they sold the building to TROSA. TROSA intended to renovate the building as a residential structure, but ultimately found that they were unable to execute the renovation.


Former Y.E. Smith / East Durham Graded School, 03.20.07

Preservation North Carolina has had an option on the purchase of the building since 2008.


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As of early 2011, Self-Help has a contract on the property. They plan to purchase and completely renovate the school building to be reactivated and become - a school again. The amusing part about it (amusing since I'm not the one having to go through it) is that Self-Help actually needs to rezone in order to put a school back in the school building.

The school is the Maureen Joy Charter school, currently located on Cornwallis Road. I'm no expert on schools, and I'm not too interested in a discussion of the relative merits of one school versus another. But from what I read online, it appears that Maureen Joy is well-regarded and will be a strong asset to the area by relocating to East Durham.

That has the potential to bookend what I consider the critical area of stabilization for East Durham - South Driver at Angier to South Driver at East Main. As a large, persistently vacant property, the school has brimmed with potential - but has also been a sign of disinvestment. Revitalizing the oldest school building in the city, bringing the activity of kids and parents to South Driver Street, and creating a strong asset for residents of East Durham in providing a neighborhood school is a win-win-win.


10.02.10

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35.985211,-78.877418

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ANGIER AVENUE BAPTIST CHURCH

2101
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1924
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
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In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 08/17/2011 - 12:52pm by gary

Location

35° 58' 56.1828" N, 78° 52' 39.0576" W

Comments

2101
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1924
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Angier Avenue Baptist, along with Carr Methodist, traces its origins to the establishment of East Durham in the 1880s. In 1886, two years after the establishment of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company, RT Howerton of the First Baptist Church organized Sunday School classes in one of two original schoolhouses in East Durham - the Oak Grove School on East Pettigrew Street next to the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Co.

In 1889, members of the Sunday School established the East Durham Baptist Church. Jean Anderson notes that charter members were "Mrs. Jane Gray, Mrs. FD Hudson, and Mrs. AW Renn," who donated a site for a sanctuary on the northeast corner of South Driver Street and Angier Ave.; they built a frame church structure at that location.

(Interestingly, the building is noted as the East Durham M.E. Church on the 1913 Sanborn map...)


1913 Sanborn Map.

In 1924, the original frame church was demolished and replaced by the present neoclassical brick structure; the church was renamed the Angier Avenue Baptist Church.


Angier Avenue Baptist Church, 1950s
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

In 1963, the church expanded to the north, removing houses along South Driver Street to add an "Education Building" annex.


Angier Avenue Baptist Church - Educational Building addition, 05.28.63
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)


Angier Avenue Baptist, 1980


Angier Avenue Baptist Church, 06.14.93
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

Unlike Carr Methodist, the Angier Avenue has been able to sustain itself within the context of changing demographics in East Durham and remains an active congregation.


Angier Avenue Baptist, 10.02.10

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35.982273,-78.877516

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CARR UNITED METHODIST AND PARSONAGE - EAST PEABODY

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1886
/ Modified in
1908
,
1916
,
1932
/ Demolished in
1980s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
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In tours

Last updated

  • Sun, 01/26/2014 - 7:54pm by gary

Location

35° 58' 51.474" N, 78° 52' 50.2212" W

Comments

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1886
/ Modified in
1908
,
1916
,
1932
/ Demolished in
1980s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

Carr United Methodist Church - 1900

(Courtesy Rod Mullen)

Carr United Methodist church began out of the establishment of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company in East Durham. Julian Carr, who, along with the Dukes was a lifelong Methodist, provided the funds to establish the church on the north side of the railroad tracks, across from the factory. The first structure was a frame building located at the northeast corner of Clay (then called Watts) and Peabody Streets.

At a quarterly conference at Trinity Church in 1885, the main topic of discussion was church expansion - to reach out to the people of the eastern and western parts of Durham. At that time, a building committee for the eastern section was appointed including: Julian S. Carr, chairman, E. J. Parrish, Rev. Alexander Walker, J. C. Angier, James Southgate, J. B. Walker, T. B. Smith, H. N. Snow, T. D. Jones, J. M. Odell, Washington Duke, and W. H. Branson. They obtained permission to hold services on the fourth floor of the East Durham Cotton Mill on E. Pettigrew Street until a church could be built. At the annual conference held in Durham in 1885, the Rev. W. S. Black was named presiding elder and the Rev. Amos Gregson, a local lay pastor was appointed pastor of the East End and West End churches. On July 22, 1886, Gregson reported to the District Conference: "The religious services of East Durham are held in the factory of the Durham Cotton Mfg. Co. At this place we have organized a church of twelve members and have a Sunday School numbering one hundred officers, teachers, and scholars. We expect soon to begin the erection of a house of worship which when finished will cost about ,000." The site for the first church, a lot of about 3/4 acres, was purchased from Mr. Grey Barbee for the sum of 0. This lot was located directly across the railroad from the mill on the southeast corner of Clay and Peabody Streets. The cornerstone of the church was laid on August 26, 1886. This date is now accepted as the birthday of Carr Methodist Church. The church was named for General Julian S. Carr, a member of the building committee, who on many occasions made liberal donations to the building fund and other needs of the church. The charter members of the church were: A. E. Brewer, Mariah Brewer, J. P. Hornbuckle, Susan S. Hornbuckle, Lela P.
Faucette, Richard F. Hornbuckle, James R. Cole, Smanthy B. Cole, Ira Mayton, A. M. Culberson, Alice W. Faucette, Laura B. Faucette, and Amos Gregson, pastor. The officers of the Sunday School were: W. H. Branson, Superintendent, E. C. Barnhardt, Secretary. Teachers were: J. R. Cole, J. P. Hornbuckle, E. W. Hayes, T. J. W. Brown, Jennie P. McLeod, Mrs. Clara Branson, Mary Geans, Nettie Wilson, Annie Lloyd, E. W. Worth, Jennie Cox, and H. C. Kirk - a total of 14. There were 114 scholars on roll. The first couple married in the church were Mr. and Mrs. T. J. W. Brown.

The first structure was only one room and was used until 1908, when a wing was built on the west side and called the Sunday School unit. This was closed off from the main room by sliding doors which could be opened and used during the worship service.

At some point between 1908 and 1913, a Parsonage was built to the north of the church.

Parsonage_ClaySt_1980.jpeg
Parsonage, 409 Clay Street, 1980

CarrMethodist_sb_1913.jpeg
1913 Sanborn showing Carr Methodist and the parsonage at the corner of Railroad (East Peabody) and Watts (Clay) Streets. Wall Street = Vale Street.

In 1916, it became evident more room was needed. Since the town was growing to the north, the trustees decided to try to secure a building site in a more centralized location. They bargained for a lot on the corner of E. Main and Driver Streets, known as the T. B. Smith property. At this time, conditions became uncertain due to World War I, so it was decided to take the money available and add a two story annex to the present building. It was added to the north side of the main room, completed in 1917 and used for 15 years.

In 1925, three houses burned on Driver Avenue near E. Main Street. The trustees secured these lots along with land purchased from Mr. H. A. Jones for a total of ,800. This amount was paid in one year. These lots provided space for the new church and parsonage.

The congregation built the new church in stages over the period of 1925-1949. It appears that the original church was demolished in 1932

The parsonage remained standing in the early 1980s, but was torn down prior to 1993.


Site of Carr Methodist, 05.08.11


Site of the Carr Methodist Parsonage, 05.08.11

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35.980965,-78.880617

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EAST DURHAM SCHOOL/415 SOWELL STREET

415
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1905
/ Demolished in
1940-1960
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

This is the former location of the East Durham School, also called East Durham Colored School.  The deplorable conditions found in the school were fairly well documented. 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 01/12/2013 - 9:01am by Karen

Location

United States
35° 58' 49.2924" N, 78° 53' 12.8688" W
US

Comments

415
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1905
/ Demolished in
1940-1960
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

 

In the early years of the school, Thomas Michener and Frank Husband were employed as principals of this school, which served a large part of East Durham's African American community. Charles Moore, the independent State Inspector of Negro Schools, said that Durham County schools for African American students were among the worst in the state.  East Durham School was the only school with more than one teacher, and only 1/3 of the schools he visited in the county had desks. 

During the night and on weekends, the East Durham school also served as the site for Homemakers Clubs, which taught local residents about gardening and canning to aid in food rationing during the war, and also as a "moonlight" school which educated adults in the area. This Sanborn map shows the school, marked at this time as East Durham Public School (Colored). Note that the top of this map is West, and that where Sowell Alley is marked is now where 147 runs through. Sowell Alley used to extend much further and created a loop with Bailey Alley. 

After East Durham became part of the city proper, it changed from a couny school to a city school, which provided even less funding. The lack of funding meant that the school deteriorated quickly, and by the 1930s it was falling apart.  The Carolina Times published an article about the deteriorating conditions on May 22, 1937, seen below. Note only the left-hand column in the first page is part of this article. 

The school seems to have been abandoned by 1939-1940. In 1942 the address was listed as the home of a screen manufacturer, but was listed as vacant again shortly after. I am unsure when the building was demolished, but it's safe to say it was demolished prior to the building of 147. The lot remained empty until 2007, when this house ws built upon the lot:

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ebenzerbaptist_050811.jpg

(FORMER) EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
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In tours

Last updated

  • Tue, 06/21/2011 - 7:17pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 58' 53.3676" N, 78° 53' 12.66" W
US

Comments

,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
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ebenzerbaptist_050811.jpg

05.08.11

 

 

I repeatedly would see the back of this old church from the Durham Freeway while driving under the R. Kelly Bryant bridge - I finally explored this little strip of land between East Pettigrew until I found it and the north side of the bridge.

 

Per the website of the current congregation, Ebenezer Baptist Church was established in 1909, moving that same year into a frame house on Lakeland Street (then known as Bailey Street.)

 

Mrs. Barrett remembers when the church members would sit on wash benches with no backs.  "We didn't have a lot of money, so dues were about 25 cents a week," recalls Mrs. Barrett.

 

To boost the church treasury, the members would hold rallies and sales on holidays. Sandwiches would sell for ten cents and lemonade for five cents a glass.  Mrs. Barrett's grandfather would fill up a wagonload of members and carry the group to a lake at Bilbo, North Carolina, for baptism. [...]

 

In 1910-1912, the ever growing congregation was situated in a school building. With the encouragement from one of the local pastors the congregation began to build a community church building. He suggested the church be named Ebenezer. It was in 1912, under the leadership of Rev. E.J. Carrington, the congregation moved into a little wooden church on the corner of Glenn and Sowell Street. Some years later, the wooden structure was torn down and a stone church was rebuilt in the same location.  

 

In 1951, the church, under the pastoral of Rev. T.A. Grady, took on the task of building a new church that would accommodate its ever increasing membership. Ebenezer was located on Glenn Street until 1968. Due to construction of the East West Expressway, the church was forced to move to its present location on 2200 South Alston Ave.

 

(I don't find the church listed in the city directory on Glenn St. until the 1919 city directory, (not listed in the previous one - 1915) but that may be a boundary issue.)

 

The building currently houses the Miracle Temple Holiness Church

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COMMONWEALTH / BRANSON / ASBURY TEMPLE UNITED METHODIST

201
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1925
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
,
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
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In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 07/27/2011 - 4:57am by gary

Location

35° 59' 8.5164" N, 78° 53' 18.258" W

Comments

201
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1925
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
,
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Looking southeast from Aniger Avenue and South Alston, 1926.
(From "Durham: Center of Industry and Education")

Likely my favorite church building in Durham, the Asbury Temple United Methodist church was built around 1925 on the southeast corner of Angier Avenue and Alston Avenue. Simple neoclassical wings extending at right angles toward Angier and Alston frame an entrance that the Architectural Inventory terms "baroque" - almost a byzantine appearing dome (which makes me think of a Turkish mosque) sitting above a curved entrance facade supported by large columns framing 3 doorways. Wow.

The congregation organized in the 1880s as the Commonwealth Methodist Episcopal Church, likely after the Commonwealth Cotton Manufacturing Company - the factory building was located ~2 blocks away. However, the Commonwealth Cotton Company was on the wane by the early 20th century, and the congregation changed their name to Branson Methodist Church in 1904. The church was named in honor of WH Branson who had been director of both the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company (located further east at Driver St.) and the Pearl Cotton Mills (located at Trinity and Duke.)

The congregation of this church diminished considerably with the waning of East Durham as a thriving community later in the 20th century. It, at some point, became the Asbury Temple United Methodist Church. It currently has an active congregation engaged with the commuity around it.


Looking southeast from Angier Avenue and South Alston, 2007.

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