Homes of East Durham

Homes of East Durham


East Durham holds one of the greatest varieties of architecture in the city, from bungalows and pyramidal cottages to Victorian farmhouses and Art Deco commercial spaces . In 2009, East Durham was voted as one of The Best “Old House” Neighborhoods in the South. The neighborhood grew around the existing farmhouses, and landowners gradually sold off their land to factories and developers. While many of the rows upon rows of mill houses have been long demolished, a few beautiful examples still remain. Workers' shacks lined up along muddy Morven's Alley are offset by the grandeur of the Dr. George Ross House or the beauty of the Griffin Barbee house. From the 1920s-1930s there was a second wave of homes being built to the north side of the neighborhood, where you see more Craftsmans and Tudors and later styles.

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519 PARK AVENUE - FD MARKHAM HOUSE

519
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1880-1890
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Sheriff Felix D. Markham's late 19th century farmhouse, which once encompassed land around it, developed into housing in the 1930s, gives a sense of the original development pattern of large farmsteads in the area that would become East Durham.

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Last updated

  • Sat, 11/10/2012 - 9:00am by gary

Location

35° 59' 30.444" N, 78° 52' 39.9936" W

Comments

519
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1880-1890
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


519 Park, 1980

One of the oldest houses in East Durham, 519 Park Avenue originally sat on larger parcel of land, and faced onto Lottie Street, now Liberty; the side of the house, facing Park, has been converted to the front entrance. Details imply a construction date of ~1880s.

(Below in italics is from the 2004 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Felix D. Markham House. This large I-House actually faces Liberty Street to the north, thus presents its east side to Park Avenue. Although it is so altered that it is noncontributing, it does retain a large east gable chinmey, a front cross-gable with a peaked window. Most of the front windows and door have been removed, vinyl covers the entire house, and all sash have been replaced. A large 2-story rear addition was added to create four apartments. This appears on late 19th century Sanborn maps. The property from Liberty, Southgate, Guthrie and Driver streets was the farm of sheriff Felix D. Markham. It was subdivided into lots in 1920 by the Durham Realty & Insurance Company (Plat Book 3, 111). Realtor George W. Hursey lived here in the 1920s. By 1935 it had been converted to 4 apartments. 1935-1960:4 apartments. 1937 SM: apartments.

A 1923 plat denotes this as the FD Markham Homeplace, and divides the original property - through which this section of Park Avenue was cut to continue the extant, north-of-Lottie section southward - into 14 parcels.


Subdivision plat, 1923, with the house and outbuilding outlines shown.

Unfortunately, time had already seen the subdivision of the original house into multiple apartments by the 1980 photo above; since then the vinylization has removed much of the original detailing of the house. It's owned by a Raleigh investor who bought it with bunch of other properties from a similar owner of a bunch of historic rental houses in East Durham in 2005.

I wouldn't be sad if all of these rental companies that own 10 or 30 or 100 historic houses in Durham went quietly into the good night and we never heard from them again. Nothing good seems to come of their ownership, except the incentive to make money off of students and impoverished people by keeping rents low, by keeping the conditions of the housing marginal-at-best, and doing the cheapest home depot repairs possible when absolutely necessary.


519 Park, 02.26.11

I understand the rationale for the State Historic Preservation Office and National Park Service to consider this non-contributing, and thus ineligible for historic tax credits. It's a slippery slope in trying to hang on to a credible definition of what is historic and what isn't. The reality is that it's pretty arbitrary. Consultants may bristle against that notion, because it's a matter of pecuniary interest to them, but this house clearly still contributes to the district - and it would be wonderful incentive to someone to restore it to its original glory to have tax credits available. Historic folks fall prey to the details for fear of having their authority assailed, but really - this is a late 19th century farmhouse that sits amid 1930s structures, and gives a sense of the 'first wave' of development of this area. The historic district would not be diminished at all if it were demolished? Silliness.

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rowlandgregory_holloway_1960s.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_2/1402holloway_1980.jpg1402Holloway_RowlandGregory_100210.jpeg

1402 HOLLOWAY / ROWLAND-GREGORY HOUSE / AGAPE SCHOOL

1402
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1900-1912
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

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Last updated

  • Tue, 11/13/2012 - 8:35am by gary

Location

35° 59' 38.5008" N, 78° 52' 35.5584" W

Comments

1402
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1900-1912
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

rowlandgregory_holloway_1960s.jpg

Rowland-Gregory House, late 1960s

(Courtesy Durham County Library)


1402 Holloway, 1980

Below in italics per the Historic Inventory - not verified for accuracy by this author:

The principal stylistic elements of the two-story hip-roofed house consist of Doric columns supporting the wraparound porch and porte cochere, a Palladian window in the attic dormer on the main facade, and the pedimented gables of the shallow wings on the side elevations. Retaining its original tall chimneys and slate roof, the house is prominently situated on a very large corner lot and surrounded by mature hardwoods.

William B. Rowland, bookkeeper with Blackwell's Durham Tobacco Company, who lived here in 1912, probably had the house built. Mrs. Mary F. Rowland resided here in 1925. The Bonnie M. Gregory family, owners of the Rite-Way Laundry on Angier Ave., are listed here by 1930. They lived here for many years. [1912 CD; Roberts, Durham A &HI, 87]

The house has been remuddled a good bit since that time. It appears it came under ownership of the Agape School in 1986, so presumably the school did it. Such would seem confirmed by their recent Home Depot-esque garish remodel of the house at 1217 Holloway - otherwise known as the red-roof-you-can-see-from z=15 on Google Maps.

1402Holloway_RowlandGregory_100210.jpeg
1402 Holloway, 10.02.10

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1217 HOLLOWAY STREET - WOODS FARMHOUSE

1217
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

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Last updated

  • Wed, 11/14/2012 - 4:15pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 40.524" N, 78° 52' 42.8196" W
US

Comments

1217
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 


1217 Holloway, 02.26.11

I alluded to the Agape School's recent renovation of 1217 Holloway Street in writing about their previous/original location in the Rowland-Gregory House down the block.

1217 Holloway appears, from its simple two-story farmhouse form, to have been an earlier structure than the more highly detailed single story houses surrounding it. Hugh and Geneva Woods appear to have lived in the house in the 1910s, with their address listed only as "Holloway near 1st Avenue [North Driver]". Hugh appears to have died by 1919, and Geneva lived in the house until the mid 1920s.

It appears to have become a rooming house or duplex after that, with Chester Carden, a carpenter, and John Taylor, a stonemason, living in the house during the 1940s and 1950s (with separate phone numbers,) occasionally with others.

(Below in italics is from the 2004 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Two-story side-gabled I-House with a front cross-gable and a 2-story rear ell. Original features are 2-over-2 sash windows and a hipped wraparound porch with Doric posts. These have been cut off and are supported with masonry blocks now. The original front door has been replaced by a window, and the comer bay of the porch is enclosed as a room. Extensive rear 1-story additions. Asbestos siding. The house is now a private school called "Agape Corner School." 1925 CD.

The house had deteriorated a good bit by the time Google came around in 2007.

1217Holloway_Summer2007.jpeg
Summer 2007

Agape appears to have bought it by this time, and began to renovate/demolish/rebuild in 2009.

1217Holloway_1_042909.jpg
Via the Agape Corner School's Flickr feed, 04.29.09


Via the Agape Corner School's Flickr feed, 05.12.09

I suppose I should be happy that there is some semblance of the original farmhouse still standing, but I'm not, really. There is some of the original structure remaining behind the vinyl and lipstick, but like in much of East Durham, the original proportions and details have been wiped away with undersized replacement windows, suburban-style fake shutters, and two windowless steel doors on the front porch than inform one that the entrance is from the rear parking lot.

The bright red roof isn't terrible in and of itself, but combined with the rest of the plastification, makes it look like some kind of giant toy, rather than a historic structure. The sad thing is that it could have done attractively and proportionally, for no significant cost difference, if someone simply cared enough (and was honest with themselves about their inability to make good aesthetic choices.) I mean, just call Preservation Durham or leave a comment on here. It isn't hard.

(If I seem unduly harsh, I may be slightly influenced by the unpleasant ?teacher/?adminstrator who accosted me for taking photos of the 1402 Holloway school from the street - demanded to know my name, what I was doing, why I was doing it, name of the site, etc., and seemed thoroughly uninterested in someone writing about the history of the buildings. Easy for me to connect the dots between that and the outcome above.)
 

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marvinsalleypublicityandconditions_2_011749.jpgMorvenAlley_1937.jpgmarvinsalleypublicityandconditions_2_011749.jpgmarvinsalleypublicityandconditions_1_011749.jpgmarvinsalley_2_043076.jpg

1304 MORVEN PLACE - MARVIN'S ALLEY / MORVEN'S ALLEY

1304
,
Durham
NC
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Sun, 11/13/2011 - 11:32pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 6.1044" N, 78° 53' 15.3348" W
US

Comments

1304
,
Durham
NC
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

marvinsalleypublicityandconditions_2_011749.jpg

MorvenAlley_1937.jpg
1937 Sanborn Map

Perhaps the most infamous street in Durham, known variously as South Holman Place, Morven Place, Morven's Alley, and Marvin's Alley, began its existence as mill housing for the Commonwealth Cotton Mill. The Commonwealth was briefly revitalized as the Morven Cotton Mill in 1922, only to close again in the early 1930s.

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"Marvin Alley Publicity and Conditions, 01.17.49"

marvinsalleypublicityandconditions_1_011749.jpg
"Marvin Alley Publicity and Conditions, 01.17.49

The more deeply I delve into Durham history, the more fascinating place it becomes. Despite repeated efforts by the powers-that-be  - whether the Big Four churches downtown, the city government, or the business community - to sanitize Durham of its seamy side, it simply went further underground, and behind closed doors.

Gambling houses, liquor houses, and the like proliferated on Morven's Alley. The story goes that the street was owned by the former mill, not the city, and the police weren't 'able' to patrol it. I sort of doubt that - my guess would be simply that they didn't.

Morven's Alley garnered an outsize reputation; there were dozens of streets and houses like it throughout Durham. There still are. But the street became most famous as the inspiration for the song "Tobacco Road" - written by Durham native John Loudermilk, and recorded by a number of people. As John Schelp conveyed it to me:

Loudermilk told me 'Marven's Alley' in East Durham was the inspiration for his hit song, "Tobacco Road' (see lyrics below).

Loudermilk often delivered telegrams and money orders to homes along this little lane, just east of the Angier/Alston intersection. He remarked how the shades were always drawn and describes the homes as one of three things: liquor house, gambling house, or house of ill-repute. (Since the mills had owned the street and the houses, the local police did not patrol the area.)

Loudermilk was born in 1934, so it's likely that Morven's Alley resembled the 1949 shots above when he was so inspired as a boy making deliveries. The lyrics to the song:

I was born in a dump
Mama died and daddy got drunk
Left me here to die or grow
In the middle of Tobacco Road

Grew up in a rusty shack
All I owned was a-hangin' on my back
Only Lord knows how I loathe
This place called Tobacco Road

But it's home
The only life I've ever knowed
But the Lord knows I loathe
Tobacco Road

Gonna leave, get a job
With the help and the grace of God
Save my money, get rich, I know
Bring it back to Tobacco Road

Bring a dynamite and a crane
Blow it up and start all over again
Build a town, be proud to show
Keep the name "Tobacco Road"

'Cause it's home
The only life I've ever knowed
I despite you, 'cause you're filthy
But I love you, 'cause you're home
Tobacco Road

marvinsalley_2_043076.jpg
"Marvin's Alley, 04.30.76"

Not much is left of Morven Place at this point - two houses. Somehow, it still felt like I shouldn't go down the street unless I was there to do business. But maybe that was just my imagination. 

morvenplace_063011.jpg

1304 Morven Place, 06.30.11

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604 N Driver.jpg

604 North Driver Street

604
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1930
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 10/13/2012 - 10:28pm by VF

Location

United States
35° 59' 29.8716" N, 78° 52' 42.3624" W
US

Comments

604
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1930
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Side-gabled 1 1/2 story bungalow with gabled dormer, German siding, eave brackets and exposed rafter tails, and 4-over-1 vertical sash windows. Shed Craftsman porch. 1930 CD.

C Garage. 1930s. Front-gable garage with weatherboard and exposed rafter tails.

604 N Driver.jpg

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1805Vale_1980.jpeg/sites/default/files/images/2011_6/cheekland_1905.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_6/1805Vale_012211.jpg

1805 VALE STREET - CHEEK FARMHOUSE

1805
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 12/08/2012 - 11:04pm by gary

Location

35° 58' 56.7156" N, 78° 52' 52.8924" W

Comments

1805
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1805Vale_1980.jpeg

One of the oldest houses remaining in East Durham, the Cheek Farmhouse at 1805 Vale Street was once at the center of a significantly larger piece of land. By 1905, the farmhouse and land were in the possession of Howard A. Foushee (b. 1870 - d.1916) and he subdivided the large property into building lots.


Subdivision plat showing the Cheek farmhouse in the center (lot 26.) (Wall Street = Vale Street ; Watts Street=Clay Street; Elm Street=Vine Street.)

The inventory surmises that the house was remodeled sometime in the early 20th century, which is consistent with some of the architectural detail that would have been inconsistent with a mid-19th century farmhouse.

The house has been owner-occupied since the mid-2000s.


01.22.11

 

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)2-story side-gable I-house with a front cross-gable with sawnwork bargeboard, German siding, and a hipped porch. Alterations include replacement sash windows and replacement turned porch posts. This property was the center of the large Cheek farm that was subdivided in 1905. J.N. Cheek, listed in 1880s city directories as an East Durham farmer living near a cooton mill, was probably the owner. The interior contains some Greek Revival-style mid-19th century doors. The house may have been rebuilt from an older house or the doors may have been salvaged from another house. [Roberts, Durham A & HI, 93, 1913 SM] 1930-1940 CDs: James D. Carpenter owner/occupant (boxmaker).

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.982421,-78.881359

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1808ValeStreet-MullenHouse_1910s.jpg1808Vale_2004.jpeg/sites/default/files/images/2011_6/1808ValeStreet_012211.jpg

1808 VALE STREET

1808
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1905
/ Modified in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 12/08/2012 - 9:02am by gary

Location

35° 58' 55.5204" N, 78° 52' 53.0796" W

Comments

1808
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1905
/ Modified in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1808ValeStreet-MullenHouse_1910s.jpg

1808 Vale Street and the Mullen Family, 1910s

(Courtesy Rod Mullen)

The house received a large eastward addition, likely during the 1910s.

1808Vale_2004.jpeg

1808 Vale Street, ~2004


1808 Vale Street, 01.22.11

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

2-story gable-and-wing type house with German siding, 2-over-2 sash windows, and a full hip-roof porch with original turned posts and sawnwork brackets. 1925-1935 CDs: Eliza O'Neal occupant. 1940 CD: 2 tenants.

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.982089,-78.881411

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1914 CARDEN ALLEY- JOHN W. MARCOM HOUSE

1914
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

The John Marcom House is a 1-story tri-gable house with vinyl siding, replacement windows, and a hipped porch with replacement stone piers.  The original owner, textileworker John W. Marcom and his wife Jennie,  lived here for more than half of the last century. 

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Last updated

  • Sun, 01/13/2013 - 8:17am by Karen

Location

United States
35° 58' 54.1524" N, 78° 52' 44.6844" W
US

Comments

1914
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

 

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

 

John Marcom House. 1-story tri-gable house with vinyl siding, replacement windows, and a hipped porch with replacement stone piers. The porch posts are covered with vinyl. 1913 SM. 1930-1940 CDs: John W. Marcom owner/occupant (textileworker). 

John W. Marcom,  and later just his widow Jennie Clevie Nutt Marcom, lived in this house for almost 5 decades. John, like many of Carden Alley's residents, worked in one of the neighborhood's textile mills.

Many members of the Marcom family lived within a block or two of here from the turn of the century through the 1930s, including Julius E. Marcom,  and later Rosa Marcom Vickers,  who at separate points in time, both lived at 1907 Carden's Alley; Walter M. and Annie Marcom at 1610 East Main Street; George and Ella Marcom at 1703 Angier Avenue; Lewis H. Marcom at 1817 Vale Street; J. Clarence Marcom at 1815 Vale Street; and J. Lewis and Hazel Marcom at 512 Bacon Street. 

Carden Alley/Carden Lane runs both East/West and North/South, and the numbers therefore change from 300/400s to 1900s. Carden's Alley was possibly named for William A. Carden who was listed as a resident on Carden's Alley in the 1917 CD.  Carden's occupation was listed as "Drayman", which is nearly a non-existant profession thesedays. A drayman is someone who drives an open flatbed trucks drawn by horses to transport material. I imagine surrounded by the railyard and numerous factories that work was easy to come by for him.  For other photos of of the street as well as some great memories in the comments section from past area residents, visit Gary's post on Carden Alley

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1609 ANGIER AVENUE

1609
,
Durham
NC
/ Demolished in
2007
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

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Last updated

  • Fri, 07/08/2011 - 11:53pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 3.7716" N, 78° 52' 59.4444" W

Comments

1609
,
Durham
NC
/ Demolished in
2007
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

1609 Angier Ave., looking west-northwest, late 2006.

1928: Clements, EP
1934: Clements, E Pate
1940: D_____, H___P
1945: Lloyd, Mack N.
1950: Stell, Fredrick
1955: “
1960: Sineath, Troy


Looking northwest, 2007, after teardown by NIS


Progress, 2011.

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.984381,-78.883179

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221SGuthrie.jpg

221 SOUTH GUTHRIE

221
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sun, 07/24/2011 - 9:58pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 58' 57.7452" N, 78° 52' 32.7864" W
US

Comments

221
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

221SGuthrie.jpg

Pictured in photo:

 

Clara Burcham, Tom Burcham, Charlie Burcham, Mrs. Burcham, Francis Burcham

Likely 1910s

(Courtesy Billie Boyd)

Located in the 'triangle' of land between Proctor Place (now Harvard Avenue) and Ashe Street, facing South Guthrie Street

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213SouthDriver_100210.jpeg213SDriver_2006.jpeg213SDriver_2011.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/213%20S%20Driver%20Entry.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/213%20S%20Driver%20Kit.jpg

213 SOUTH DRIVER STREET

213
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
/ Modified in
1930-1950
,
2011
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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Last updated

  • Sat, 11/16/2013 - 9:14am by gary

Location

35° 58' 59.6028" N, 78° 52' 38.8668" W

Comments

213
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
/ Modified in
1930-1950
,
2011
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

213SouthDriver_100210.jpeg
213 South Driver, 10.02.10

Likely built in the first decade of the 20th century, 213 South Driver was likely remodeled in the 1930s or 1940s, giving the porch and the interior a more mid-century feel.

Back in 2005-6, before foreclosure was a household word, I ID'ed this as a potential property to help the revitalization of this corridor while working with Preservation Durham. I spent months navigating the intricacies of the REO world on this and two other properties that I hoped to get donated to Preservation Durham. Two banks just weren't willing to try to make something work, but I found the folks at Bank of America, which owned 213 S. Driver, to be sympathetic to what we hoped to accomplish in the neighborhood. It was a long process, but ultimately successful, as the house was donated to Preservation Durham in May of 2006. A big thanks to Bank of America - particularly David Tiberio, then-Vice President and Manager of the Real Estate Office in New York for going outside the box to make that happen.

213SDriver_2006.jpeg
213 South Driver at the time of donation, 2006. (With me petting a neighborhood cat that came up to say hello during our picture-taking for the Preservation Durham newsletter.)

Unfortunately, Preservation Durham was unable to sell the property or do much with it after that - I stopped being involved in the organization in mid-2006, so I can't speak to the difficulties, although I'm sure money was an issue. But it has been a shame - and I particularly felt embarrassed regarding the revitalization picture I painted to BoA that it has stayed in a dilapidated state this long.

Fortunately, Preservation Durham and Preservation North Carolina have started to renovate the house over the past few months; I believe, based on a conversation John Compton and I had about Scientific Properties' use of CDBG funds from the city to renovate 1102 Wall Street that they've made similar use of the funds. Kudos to them for finding a way to get this house moving forward and a part of the revitalization of East Durham.

213SDriver_2011.jpg

Completed house, summer 2011 (Courtesy PNC); under contract Summer of 2013; back on the market in fall of 2013.

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

1-story tri-gable house with 6-over-6 sash windows and a full front porch. Alterations include aluminum siding, boxed porch posts and a metal railing, and replacement front wndows. Along the front yard is a stone retaining wall. 1930 CD: Demetrius Carlton occupant (mill hand).

C Garage. Ca. 1930. Front-gable garage with metal siding.

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ea1349892664.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/1918%20Hart%20side%20view.jpgea1349369520.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/1918%20Hart%20Ktichen.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/1918%20Hart%20Interior%20New.jpg

1918 HART ST.

1918
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 08/07/2013 - 4:20pm by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 2.6628" N, 78° 52' 44.2668" W
US

Comments

1918
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

ea1349892664.jpg

Below in italics from the 2004 East Durham NR listing; not verified for accuracy by this author:

1 1/2-story side-gable house with German siding, replacement vinyl windows, and a hipped porch with replacement metal posts and railing. The form indicates that it may have been constructed as a mill worker's dwelling. 1913 SM. 1930 CD: Everett C. Johnson occupant (auto mechanic).

ea1349369520.jpg

Per Preservation NC:

The interior features wood floors throughout, period doors, and a second floor master suite. Plans include three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a separate laundry room off the kitchen.

PNC is fully renovating the house as part of its Project RED effort in partnership with Preservation Durham. It will be sold with protective covenants as a single-family owner-occupied residence. Eligible buyers may take advantage of state tax credits and a ,000 Forgivable Loan toward purchase. See link:

http://www.presnc.org/index.php?option=com_estateagent&Itemid=80&act=obj...

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2117EMain_0143.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/2117EMain_BoydHouse_1980.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/2117EMain_BoydHouse_100210.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/2117%20E%20Main%20Stair.jpg/sites/default/files/images/u147/2117%20E%20Main%20Foyer.jpg

2117 EAST MAIN - BOYD HOUSE

2117
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Mon, 06/17/2013 - 12:38pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 9.6432" N, 78° 52' 35.2812" W

Comments

2117
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

2117EMain_0143.jpg

2117 East Main Street, looking north from Guthrie and Main, January 1943

(Courtesy Billie Boyd)


2117 East Main, 1980

Carpenter Thomas M. Young built this two-story T-shaped house around 1905. Mr. Boyd, who had been living in a house next door on South Guthrie Ave. that was constructed by Young for his daughter and her husband, purchased this house from the Young estate and moved into it in 1930 after leasing it out for a short while.

One room additions on the rear of the original house resulted in a double-pile center hall plan on the first story. The basic house type is enhanced on the interior by handsome woodworking and intricate Victorian mantelpieces with overmantels featuring rich turned ornament that reflect Mr. Young's carpentry skills.

The Boyd family has continued to live in the house since the 1930s, although as of March 2011, it is for sale.

2117 East Main, 10.02.10

 

(Below in italics is from the 2004 East Durham National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Young-Boyd House. Large 2-story gable-and-wing house with a 2-story rear ell, 4-over-4 sash windows, and a 1-story porch sheltering the main block with replacement Craftsman posts. A hipped porch extends the length of the side elevation facing N. Guthrie Ave., with replacement metal posts. All-over vinyl siding. Carpenter Thomas M. Young built the house for himself. The interior contains handsome woodwork created by Mr. Young. At Mr. Young's death about 1930, M.R. Boyd, Sr., who lived next door on N. Guthrie Ave., purchased the house and lived here. His son inherited the house and was still living here in the 1980s. [Robert, Durham A&HI} 1913 SM. 

NC Shed/Carport . Ca. 1950, ca 1960. Front-gable shed with German siding connected to a front-gable vinyl-sided shed by a 2-car wooden carport.

 

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.986012,-78.876467

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Dr Ross home_E Durham.jpeg/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/RossEstate_plat_1947.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/2111EMain_RossHouse_1980.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_3/2111EMain_RossHouse_100210.jpg

2111 EAST MAIN / DR. GEORGE ROSS HOUSE

2111
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

Dr. George Ross house- highly unusual front porch with diagnonal gables and center chimney; Ross was the family physician to East Durham, and his house was a centerpiece of the community

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In tours

Last updated

  • Thu, 10/04/2012 - 10:52pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 10.3668" N, 78° 52' 36.8724" W

Comments

2111
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1920-1930
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

Dr Ross home_E Durham.jpeg
Postcard of the Ross House, circa 1930s
(Courtesy Sherry Handfinger)

One of the more unusual early 20th century houses still standing in Durham is the Dr. George Ross house at 2111 East Main Street. Ross lived at this location, which doubled as his medical office, from the early 20th century until his death in 1941. Ross was born in 1863 - I'm not sure when he built his original house at this location, but the house which still stands was constructed in the 1920s, replacing the original.

The National Register listing states:

Large 2-story Craftsman-style house with a pyramidal roof, wide boxed eaves, 9-over-1 and 12-over-1 sash windows, and an unusual center front chimney. The most unusual feature are the 1-story front wings set on the diagonal, with a connecting bowed porch. The porch has elephantine granite posts and granite steps, wood-shingled upper posts, and a weatherboarded railing. The front elevation ofthe wings have replacement sliding windows. All-over vinyl siding. A semicircular front dliveway is marked by granite entrance piers. Dr. George Ross built a house on this lot about 1905, and replaced it with this house in the 1920s. He maintained his office here. The house was a showplace of East Durham in the 1920s.

In 1944, Eddie Royal was living in the house, likely as a tenant of Ross' widow. It appears that he bought the house at auction when she died in 1947

In 1952, "live bait" is listed after his name in the city directory. By 1957, he shared the house with Esther Jinks, but Esther is gone by 1960. Eddie Royal and his wife Myrtle sold the property to Bobby and Patricia Holliman in 1961, who sold the house to the Gonzales family in 1997, who sold the house to the current owner in 2007.


Ross House, 1980

The front porch and orientation of the house is unusual; the inventory describes it thusly:

Its focal point is the one story wing on the main facade consisting of two gable-roofed wings set at angles to each other and to the main two-story double-pile block. These one-story wings are spanned by a shallow superimposed gable above a curved porch supported by elephantine piers. The porch piers, gables and second story of the main block are sheathed in split shake shingles, while the lower elevations are weatherboarded. Another unorthodox feature of the house is the very narrow exterior chimney on the main facade that pierces the deep eaves of the high hipped roof and culminates in a corbelled stack.

Effusively architecturally jargony description aside, it's a wonderfully strange design.


2111 East Main, 10.02.10

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35.986191,-78.877015

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2108 EAST MAIN / ALFORD HOUSE

2108
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
/ Modified in
1930-1940
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

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In tours

Last updated

  • Thu, 10/04/2012 - 10:43pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 8.376" N, 78° 52' 38.5968" W

Comments

2108
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1900
/ Modified in
1930-1940
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


2108 East Main, 1985
(Courtesy Sherry Handfinger)

From the historic inventory:

This late 19th century house constructed for [Thomas] Alford is one of the most elaborate Queen Anne style houses surviving in East Durham. Originally, the house stood on South Guthrie Avenue directly behind the former Y.E. Smith School. It was built for Thomas H. Alford, who ran D.L. Alford and Company, a grocery and general merchandise store on South Driver Street. The city purchased the house in the 1930s for use by the school's home economics department. The house was moved to the present site in the 1930s to make room for additions to the rear of the school.

Its vernacular ornament concentrated in the gables consists of scalloped boards and carved sunbursts supported by sawn brackets. The west gable surmounts a two-story three-sided bay and incorporates sawn drop pendant brackets at its apex. The porch posts of box pylons on brick plinths appear to be replacement supports, probably installed when the house was moved to its present site.


1950s aerial showing the west side of 2108 East Main before the construction of the fire station next store.


2108 East Main, 1985
(Courtesy Sherry Handfinger)

The house was purchased by the current owner-occupant in 2007.


2108 East Main, 10.02.10


2108 East Main, 10.02.10

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35.985715,-78.877456

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105CherryGrove_01.jpg105CherryGrove_03.jpg105CherryGrove_13.jpg

105 CHERRY GROVE ST.

105
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Large 2-story Queen Atme-style house of gable-and-wing form, with a 2-story cutaway bay window in the front wing, a secondary front gable, German siding, and 1-over-1 sash windows. Mrs. Lydia Griffin bought this house about 1920 when she moved to Durham from Chatham County. Mrs. Griffin sold the house to Arthur and Frances Barbee about 1930.

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In tours

Last updated

  • Thu, 05/24/2012 - 7:53am by gary

Location

United States
35° 59' 10.428" N, 78° 52' 45.8472" W
US

Comments

105
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

105CherryGrove_01.jpg

Griffin-Barbee House. Large 2-story Queen Anne-style house of gable-and-wing form, with a 2-story cutaway bay window in the front wing, a secondary front gable, German siding, and 1-over-1 sash windows. The door has one sidelight. The full porch has original classical columns.

Mrs. Lydia Griffin bought this house about 1920 when she moved to Durham from Chatham County. Mrs. Griffin sold the house to Arthur and Frances Barbee about 1930. [Roberts, Durham A&HI, 101]

105CherryGrove_03.jpg

105CherryGrove_13.jpg

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