2007 Preservation Durham Home Tour: "The Trinity Tour"

2007 Preservation Durham Home Tour: "The Trinity Tour"


EAST DUKE BUILDING

Durham
NC
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

The East and West Duke Buildings were under design before the Washington Duke Building burned in 1911; the plan was already being developed to demolish Old Main and replace it with two new academic and administrative buildings. East Duke served as the administration building for Trinity College and, later, for the Women's College. 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Tue, 06/26/2012 - 8:35pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 17.6472" N, 78° 54' 51.0588" W
US

Comments

Durham
NC
Built in
1912
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

The East and West Duke Buildings were under design before the Washington Duke Building burned in 1911; the plan was already being developed to demolish Old Main and replace it with two new academic and administrative buildings. The East and West Duke Buildings would also shift the main entry of the campus to align with the central axis of the original racetrack, and the three buildings within that oval: Craven, the LIbrary, and Alspaugh.

As is clear from the drawing above, the original plan was to build a connecting colonnade walkway between the buildings with a central tower - it appears that vehicles would pass through arched openings beneath the tower. Why the tower and connecting walkway weren't built isn't clear - practicality and money probably had some influence on the decision.

East Duke served as the administration building for Trinity College and, later, for the Women's College. The West Duke Building contained the college barbershop, bookstore, post office, and held a theater in the basement. The psychology (and parapsychology) departments were located on the 2nd floor after 1935.

East Duke, August, 2010

 

Location of East Duke

Add new comment

/sites/default/files/images/2010_7/eakesmabry_1980.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_7/eakesmabry_100309.jpg

EAKES HOUSE - 301 WATTS

301
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
~1910s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sat, 07/30/2011 - 8:41pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 12.978" N, 78° 54' 41.5008" W

Comments

301
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
~1910s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Eakes House, 1980

The land on which the Eakes-Mabry house sits was purchased in 1909 by JS Hall, of the Hall-Wynne Funeral Home and sold in August 1909 to John L. Eakes, proprietor of the Model Steam Laundry on West Main St. It appears that Hall sold only the land, Eakes built the house. By 1923, it was the home of Jesse Ormond, a teacher at Trinity College, and by the 1950s-1960s, Mrs. Myrtle Harris lived in the house.


Eakes House, 10.03.09

Find this spot on a Google Map.

36.003605,-78.911528

Add new comment

/sites/default/files/images/2010_2/card2.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_2/card1.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_2/card3.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_2/card4.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_2/card5.jpg

CARD HOUSE

1110
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1910
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sun, 07/10/2011 - 11:50pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 16.9776" N, 78° 54' 43.8732" W

Comments

1110
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1910
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Card house 1910s.
(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)

Per the Historic Inventory:

"WW Card, the first athletic director of Trinity College, had this substantial two-story frame house constructed around 1910. As one of the earliest houses constructed in Trinity Park, this house for many years was isolated on a very large lot. According to one of the Card daughters, Mrs. Card drew the plans for the house and then her husband hired the contractors to build it. The exterior of the house [....] features plain frieze and cornerboards, Tuscan porch columns, and a trabeated entrance."


(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


Card house, 1920s

(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


From the front porch of the card house, looking southwest towards Trinity College, 1920s

(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


Card house, 1930s.

(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


Side of the Card house, looking north on Buchanan Blvd., with the Pegram house in the background, late 1920s.

(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


Card House, 10.03.09

Find this spot on a Google Map.

36.004716,-78.912187

Add new comment

406NBuchanan_030610.jpg

406 NORTH BUCHANAN BLVD.

406
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1908
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Sun, 11/20/2011 - 9:13am by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 21.6612" N, 78° 54' 43.4304" W
US

Comments

406
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1908
Architectural style: 
,
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

406NBuchanan_030610.jpg

Edwards House.

Dr. Charles w. Edwards, Professor of Physics at Trinity College and Duke University, had this house constructed in 1908. It was the second house built opposite the campus on N. Buchanan Blvd., which then was named Guess Rd.

The design of the house is eclectic, featuring neoclassical dentil cornices and Doric porch columns, latticed window sashes, and an Arts and Crafts style front door and sidelights. The central hall is paneled and has pocket doors leading to the principal rooms.

Add new comment

BASSETT-BROWN HOUSE

410
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Wed, 11/20/2013 - 8:38am by gary

Location

36° 0' 22.5396" N, 78° 54' 43.0884" W

Comments

410
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1905
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 
,

 

John Spencer Bassett, whose tenure at Trinity College and importance in the growth of academic freedom via the 'Bassett Affair' I've previously profiled lived in one of the Faculty Row houses until 1905, when he started construction on the house at 410 N. Buchanan Blvd. Per the Duke Archives, Bassett left for Northampton, MA in 1906.

It's difficult to track who lived in the house from 1906 to 1919, but it appears that perhaps the Loveless family lived in the house in 1907-1911. Frank C. Brown, English professor at Trinity College (who had lived on Faculty Row as well) moved into the house at 410 N. Buchanan in 1916 after the Faculty Row houses were moved off campus. He and his wife lived in the house through the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. It appears that his wife Mary lived in the house through ~1955, at which point it was occupied by Josiah Murray.

It appears that local realtor and City Council member Eugene Brown and his wife bought the house from the Foundation for Research on the Nature of Man in 1980, and still reside in the house.

1980 (Durham Architectural Inventory)

03.31.10 (Photo by Gary Kueber)

Add new comment

 

ANGIER B. DUKE GYMNASIUM / 'THE ARK'

Durham
NC
Built in
1898
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

Built and furnished in 1898 with a donation from Benjamin N. Duke, the building was officially named the Angier B. Duke Gymnasium in honor of his son. The building is probably the first college gymnasium in the state. The building was the site of the second intercollegiate basketball game in the state, and should be considered the birthplace of Duke Basketball

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Mon, 08/22/2011 - 2:49pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 0' 25.6824" N, 78° 54' 48.7728" W
US

Comments

Durham
NC
Built in
1898
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

 

Built and furnished in 1898 with a donation from Benjamin N. Duke, the building was officially named the Angier B. Duke Gymnasium in honor of his son who was then fourteen years old.

The building is probably the first college gymnasium in the state. The director of the gymnasium from 1899 to 1902, Albert Whitehouse, was the first paid physical education director in North Carolina. Whitehouse proudly boasted of a large and well arranged building equipped with the latest gymnastic equipment, a running track, baseball batting cage, bowling alley, swimming pool, trophy room and shower baths. Formal instruction in physical education took place between Thanksgiving and Easter with outdoor activities scheduled in the fall and spring.

For years campus literature has proclaimed that the Ark was the site of the first intercollegiate basketball game in the state. On March 2, 1906, Trinity played host to Wake Forest in a game which Wake won 24 to 10. When Trinity made plans for the game it may have been the first scheduled. However, the gym had to converted for basketball, a team had to be recruited and trained, and exams had to be completed. By the time the game took place Wake Forest already had played Guilford College. It remains the first so-called "Big Four" basketball game as nearby schools -- Duke, Carolina, State and Wake Forest -- developed intense athletic rivalries."

 

The court in the Angier gym measured 32 by 50 feet, as compared with a modern collegiate basketball court of 94 by 50 feet.

Trinity Basketball team, 1912-1913

 

"When the more modern Alumni Memorial Gymnasium opened across campus in 1923, the original gym assumed a new identity. Over the next decade as the building was put to a variety of uses, its long narrow bridge-like walkway forced people to enter "two by two;" hence, it became commonly referred to as "The Ark." The long walkway had been a gateway to a race track which was on the site when it was [Blackwell Park]. The Ark, itself, is built from lumber salvaged from the grandstand which was demolished when the fairgrounds was donated for the site for Trinity College.

No longer needed as a gym, the Ark became the cafeteria for men in 1923. The women had their own cafeteria in their new Southgate dormitory. When the new Union opened in 1930, the Ark became the campus laundry.

When West Campus opened and the original campus became exclusively for women, the students felt the need for a social center for relaxation and dancing. Though convenient to downtown, many students had to remain on campus due to financial constraints caused by the Great Depression. The Social Standards Committee of the Woman's Student Government and individual classes set about to renovate the Ark. They purchased curtains for thirty-six windows, wicker furniture, a piano, and Ping-pong and bridge tables. One class spent 5 for a combination radio and victrola and all four of the classes in residence contributed toward refinishing the floor so one could dance in socks without worrying about splinters. The student bands so popular in the West Campus Union Ballroom performed in the Ark every Saturday night and one Wednesday evening per month. Les Brown, Class of 1936, whose Band of Renown is still popular today, began his career in entertainment with one of the student bands that played regularly in the Ark. The Ark became a popular campus meeting place. As The Chronicle reported "Its past was noble; its present is enduring. Who can predict its future?"

 

Today the building continues in its eclectic tradition. It is primarily used by the Duke Dance Program and the American Dance Festival. On occasion in the summer it has had a snack bar--called the Barre--for dance festival participants. The undergraduate Duke Photo Group has its darkroom in the building. Few buildings on campus have had such a varied and student-centered history.

The Ark, 07.22.10

Angier Duke Gymnasium / 'The Ark'

 

Add new comment

922 Demerius St.

1200 West Markham Ave.

1204WMarkham_0266.jpeg/sites/default/files/images/2011_4/1204WMarkham_041711.jpg

1204 WEST MARKHAM AVENUE

1204
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Fri, 07/08/2011 - 9:09am by gary

Location

36° 0' 35.586" N, 78° 54' 47.3328" W

Comments

1204
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

1204WMarkham_0266.jpeg
1204 West Markham Avenue, February 1966


(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


04.17.11

Add new comment

813 Lancaster

801 Onslow

1516 West Markham

831 Sedgefield

/sites/default/files/images/2010_7/asburymethodist_031068.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2010_7/asbury_070410.jpg

ASBURY UNITED METHODIST

1600
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1927
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

No comments yet.

Add new comment

In tours

Last updated

  • Tue, 06/26/2012 - 3:39pm by gary

Location

36° 0' 36.6264" N, 78° 55' 4.9728" W

Comments

1600
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1927
Architect/Designers: 
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
,
Local historic district: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


Asbury United Methodist, 03.10.68
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

Asbury United Methodist began in 1894 as the West Durham Methodist Church at the corner of West Main and Ninth Streets. In 1927, the church constructed a new sanctuary, designed by Greensboro architect Harry Barton at Sixth St. and College Road / W. Markham Avenue. and moved the congregation to Trinity Heights. In 1944, the congregation changed its name to Asbury Methodist Church.

The congregation is still active today. While I think the building is beautiful, I can't say I'm a fan of the immense circa-1968 surface parking lot. Familiar theme - immense lot, full on Sundays, empty-ish a lot of other times. It particularly hurts to have the corner (and half the block face) taken up by this - maybe at some point they can find a way to do with less and at least get some building along one of the two street frontages, including the corner.


Asbury United Methodist, 07.04.10

Find this spot on a Google Map.

36.010174,-78.918048

Add new comment