JOHN WESLEY UMSTEAD HOUSE

jwumsteadhouse_hamptonroad.jpg

JOHN WESLEY UMSTEAD HOUSE

,
Rougemont
NC
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

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  • Submitted by GeorgeMangum on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 5:20pm

    The John Wesley Umstead House was located on Hampton Rd near the intersection with Dunwoody Rd and Mangum Brick Store. The house burned down in the mid 1980's and was occupied by tenant farmers at the time. The farm was purchased by Samuel Thomas Mangum in 1912 when the Umstead family wanted to move to Durham. Only the original hand dug well and some out buildings remain at the home site. The home of of his brother, Adolphus W. Umstead, is still standing and is on the National Historic Registry.

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Last updated

  • Wed, 11/02/2011 - 10:20pm by gary

Location

United States
36° 11' 49.0272" N, 78° 50' 17.0268" W
US

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,
Rougemont
NC
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 

jwumsteadhouse_hamptonroad.jpgPer Wyatt Dixon, this was the John Wesley Umstead house, where Governor William B. Umstead grew up, in 1980. Dixon describes in his column:

 

 

Dixon doesn't give an exact location (amazing how rarely people do) and I've been surprised at how difficult it has been to ascertain where the US Senator and Governor was born and raised. Based on deed research and a 1914 map, I think I've pinned down the location of his father's farmstead. John Wesley Umstead, the father, was a son of Squire Umstead, who owned a large amount of acreage in northern Orange (later Durham) County. The various pieces of other evidence seem to corroborate the location. 

The house, I'm not no sure about. There's no evidence of it at this point, and the above house seems to resemble the Adolphus Umstead house in Bahama. Adolphus was a brother (one of 13 siblings) of John W. Umstead.

Comments

The John Wesley Umstead House was located on Hampton Rd near the intersection with Dunwoody Rd and Mangum Brick Store. The house burned down in the mid 1980's and was occupied by tenant farmers at the time. The farm was purchased by Samuel Thomas Mangum in 1912 when the Umstead family wanted to move to Durham. Only the original hand dug well and some out buildings remain at the home site. The home of of his brother, Adolphus W. Umstead, is still standing and is on the National Historic Registry.

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