910 NORTH MANGUM STREET

910NMangum_1981.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2011_4/910NMangum_110709.jpg

910 NORTH MANGUM STREET

910
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by David Jeffreys on Monday, April 18, 2011 - 2:31pm

    What neat architectural details such as the oval portholes on the first and second levels and the tiny palladian window in the attic.

    Must be divided into apartments, though, with 3 or 4 mailboxes on the front porch.

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Last updated

  • Sat, 12/15/2012 - 11:41am by gary

Location

36° 0' 15.9732" N, 78° 53' 39.1344" W

Comments

910
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1900-1910
Architectural style: 
Construction type: 
National Register: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

910NMangum_1981.jpg

1981

(Below in italics is from the 1984 National Register listing; not verified for accuracy by this author.)

Attorney J.A. Giles had this two story frame house built early in the 20th century. A subsequent owner, for whom the house is
popularly named; was Benjamin c. Woodall, who lived here for many years until his death in 1933. In 1894, Mr. Woodall es- tablished a harness and saddlery business at 218 West Parrish Street. His business grew to be one of the leading saddlery houses in the city. Mr. Woodall adapted to the changing times by expanding his business to include the sale of buggies and then
bicycles, and eventually sporting goods when his store moved to Main Street. The house has a square shape with a steep hip roof
topped with two symmetrically arranged chimneys. Projecting pavilion on one side with pedimented gable roof. Stuccoed gable with Palladian window. Large ve.randa with Tuscan porch columns and unusual oval windows on both first and second story.


910 North Mangum St., 11.07.09

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36.004437,-78.894204

Comments

What neat architectural details such as the oval portholes on the first and second levels and the tiny palladian window in the attic.

Must be divided into apartments, though, with 3 or 4 mailboxes on the front porch.

Add new comment