907 FAYETTEVILLE STREET

/sites/default/files/images/2008_11/907Fayetteville_1965.jpg/sites/default/files/images/2008_11/901-907Fayetteville_100508.jpg

907 FAYETTEVILLE STREET

907
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1920
/ Demolished in
late 1960's
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Jessica T. on Thursday, November 13, 2008 - 1:09pm

    That last part is what hurts the most: The kids had no idea what had been.

    The Third Grade NC Social Studies Curriculum is supposed to be all about communities.

    Why can't we teach students about the community in which they live? Why can't we make it real for them -- letting them look at maps, and photos? Teaching them about a walkable community that was? About the social and commericial institutions and infrastructure that were? Allowing the kids to relate their learning to their homes. This is what Endangered Durham lets us do.

    The reason why not? Because it's not in the NC curriculum. it doesn't jibe with the ABC's of education.

  • Submitted by Steve on Thursday, November 13, 2008 - 1:49pm

    Very well said!

    It is too bad about what teachers HAVE to teach the kids; community to them (the kids and even the teachers) is an abstract.

    But when there's such good local examples, shouldn't they be used? It's just like Jessica said, and what Endangered Durham preaches.

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Last updated

  • Wed, 01/02/2013 - 2:45pm by gary

Comments

907
,
Durham
NC
Built in
1890-1920
/ Demolished in
late 1960's
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

The 900 block of Fayetteville St., by the 1940s, began the southern transition to the more residential portion of the Hayti neighborhood. 

907 Fayetteville was the longtime home of Ms. Bessie Whitted.


907 Fayetteville, 1962.
(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)

These structures were demolished by the late 1960s. I believe this area became part of the 1970s 'Tin City' - where the Relocation Authority placed businesses displaced by urban renewal. Most of Tin City was demolished by the 1980s, and this area was redeveloped as housing.


Site of 901-907 Fayetteville, 10.05.08

(The kids playing football in front of this house, interested in why I was taking pictures, were fascinated to learn about all of the buildings and businesses that once lined this street - for about 20 seconds, until football became far more interesting again. But they had no idea that they were living on the street where these businesses once were.)

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.984700 -78.897900

Comments

That last part is what hurts the most: The kids had no idea what had been.

The Third Grade NC Social Studies Curriculum is supposed to be all about communities.

Why can't we teach students about the community in which they live? Why can't we make it real for them -- letting them look at maps, and photos? Teaching them about a walkable community that was? About the social and commericial institutions and infrastructure that were? Allowing the kids to relate their learning to their homes. This is what Endangered Durham lets us do.

The reason why not? Because it's not in the NC curriculum. it doesn't jibe with the ABC's of education.

Very well said!

It is too bad about what teachers HAVE to teach the kids; community to them (the kids and even the teachers) is an abstract.

But when there's such good local examples, shouldn't they be used? It's just like Jessica said, and what Endangered Durham preaches.

Add new comment