701 HOLLOWAY STREET

/sites/default/files/images/2007_9/obriant_house_1950s2.jpgObrianthouse_train_1950s.jpeg701Holloway_NW_2007.jpeg701Holloway_021911.jpg701Holloway_012012.jpg

701 HOLLOWAY STREET

701
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1900
/ Modified in
2012
Construction type: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Phil on Tuesday, October 16, 2007 - 5:23am

    Clad as it is in vinyl, 701 Holloway is to my eyes the weirdest effin' building in all of Durham. I had no idea it was so old.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 16, 2007 - 12:45pm

    Didn't know they had mobile homes in the 1800s! ;)

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 16, 2007 - 8:56pm

    These houses are totally cool. They scream 'Renovate ME!'. And not being that large, it wouldn't take a herculean effort to do. Thanks for profiling these oddities Gary.

  • Submitted by Gary on Thursday, October 18, 2007 - 1:38am

    Phil

    The vinyl does contribute to that odd mansard-mobile-home look.

    Anon1

    Covered wagons?

    Anon2

    They are quirky as hell, aren't they? Too bad we seem to have, for the most part, lost the ability to inject some whimsy into our construction of new houses.

    GK

  • Submitted by Phil on Saturday, November 10, 2007 - 1:46am

    I'm fond of the small (and falling-apart) houses that line Railroad St. just south of these houses, too.

  • Submitted by Gary on Sunday, November 11, 2007 - 4:43pm

    Phil

    Agreed. I took pictures of those the same day I took the above. There is one in particular I really like with big multi-paned windows.

    GK

  • Submitted by John Martin on Monday, March 30, 2009 - 12:49am

    701 Holloway is for sale. Price $20,600, but the realtor's listing has these chilling words:
    "BRING ALL OFFERS!!! House in need of many major repairs. Great for investment purposes. Bring your investors and make us an offer!"

    Just what we need: an "investor." Please, someone with some taste, buy that house and rip off that siding. . .and fix it up nicely.

  • Submitted by Batman on Thursday, June 18, 2009 - 1:59am

    I heard from an older relative that there were some (3?) beautiful daughters of the owner living there in the 1910's-1920's -1930's. Unfortunately, I didn't pick up on the names.
    These unique homes exemplify the Victorian-era architectural motto: we'll consider anything.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Monday, December 14, 2009 - 2:35am

    Doing genealogical research today I learned that I am colaterally related to the James H Burns who built these houses. Born about 1862 in Chatham Co, he was son of Spencer Burns. He married Alice Stephens and was still living at 702 Holloway when he died in 1935. He lies buried in Maplewood Cem.

  • Submitted by John Martin on Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 11:36pm

    Sadly, 701 Holloway has shifted radically, and appears to be on the verge of collapsing.  I hope the owner can save it, but it looks very dire.

     

  • Submitted by Nancy Averette on Tuesday, May 8, 2012 - 8:51am

    They ARE rebuilding!  Any news on this?

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Last updated

  • Thu, 06/21/2012 - 9:04pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 40.8516" N, 78° 53' 21.6672" W

Comments

701
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
1900
/ Modified in
2012
Construction type: 
Type: 
Use: 

 

The unusual and unique houses at 701 and 702 Holloway, just to the east of the Durham Belt Line railroad tracks, were undoubtedly built by the same builder around the turn of the century. With intricate sawnwork (covered by vinyl siding now,) mansard roofs (including a mansard gable on 702 Holloway) and pedimented windows, these houses survive largely intact. James Burns, a grocer, was the first occupant of 702 Holloway, and probably the person who had the house(s) built.


701 Holloway next to the old Holloway St. bridge, looking north, 1950s
(Courtesy Herald-Sun)

Obrianthouse_train_1950s.jpeg
701 Holloway while the Holloway St. bridge is being replaced (with train passing through) looking northeast, 1950s
(Courtesy Herald-Sun)

701Holloway_NW_2007.jpeg
701 Holloway, 2007

This property has deteriorated significantly over the years following the above shot. It's been on the market for very low prices ( <$10K) for prolonged periods of time. 

701Holloway_021911.jpg

02.19.11

701 Holloway has been under renovation as of late 2011, but suffered some sort of structural failure in January 2012.

701Holloway_012012.jpg

01.20.12

701Fayetteville_012712.jpg

01.27.12

701Holloway_020112.jpg

Amazingly, Ken Gasch reconstructed this house.

701Holloway_061912.jpg

06.19.12

Comments

Clad as it is in vinyl, 701 Holloway is to my eyes the weirdest effin' building in all of Durham. I had no idea it was so old.

Didn't know they had mobile homes in the 1800s! ;)

These houses are totally cool. They scream 'Renovate ME!'. And not being that large, it wouldn't take a herculean effort to do. Thanks for profiling these oddities Gary.

Phil

The vinyl does contribute to that odd mansard-mobile-home look.

Anon1

Covered wagons?

Anon2

They are quirky as hell, aren't they? Too bad we seem to have, for the most part, lost the ability to inject some whimsy into our construction of new houses.

GK

I'm fond of the small (and falling-apart) houses that line Railroad St. just south of these houses, too.

Phil

Agreed. I took pictures of those the same day I took the above. There is one in particular I really like with big multi-paned windows.

GK

701 Holloway is for sale. Price $20,600, but the realtor's listing has these chilling words:
"BRING ALL OFFERS!!! House in need of many major repairs. Great for investment purposes. Bring your investors and make us an offer!"

Just what we need: an "investor." Please, someone with some taste, buy that house and rip off that siding. . .and fix it up nicely.

I heard from an older relative that there were some (3?) beautiful daughters of the owner living there in the 1910's-1920's -1930's. Unfortunately, I didn't pick up on the names.
These unique homes exemplify the Victorian-era architectural motto: we'll consider anything.

Doing genealogical research today I learned that I am colaterally related to the James H Burns who built these houses. Born about 1862 in Chatham Co, he was son of Spencer Burns. He married Alice Stephens and was still living at 702 Holloway when he died in 1935. He lies buried in Maplewood Cem.

Sadly, 701 Holloway has shifted radically, and appears to be on the verge of collapsing.  I hope the owner can save it, but it looks very dire.

 

They ARE rebuilding!  Any news on this?

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