618 FAYETTEVILLE ST.

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618 FAYETTEVILLE ST.

618
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
early 1920s
/ Demolished in
~1967-1971
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 9:50am

    I know what you mean about missing buildings you've never seen. I feel the same way about Union Station.

  • Submitted by Allison Kort on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 11:16am

    Anyone know the story on 4004 Fayetteville? I see it wears the green "condemned" sticker -- nothing especially noteworthy about its design, though I happen to love it. 'Twould be a shame to see it demolished to make way for a larger intersection with Cornwallis.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 5:29pm

    Allison,

    I don't know the story on this historic house, but it appears that it may be heir property from looking at the tax records (http://www.ustaxdata.com/nc/durham/building.cfm?ownerID=0204545%20%20%20...).

    If you are interested contact the Neighborhood Improvement Services Department about this house. 560-1647. David Jones is the inspector for this case. He was unavailable when I called.

    I would suspect this house is likely to be demolished unless someone steps up to buy it or there is a concerted effort to express concern over the existing demolition policy.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 18, 2008 - 4:25am

    Hello, love the blog.

    Was curious if you had any photos of the Fitzgerald business building on the corner of Kent and Chapel Hill--700 kent st today. (I found one partial from the 1920s on your site). Also if you knew the exact date it was built? I had heard "1890s" though it's possible that was just when the Fitzgerald business was most active, since I think you mention 1910?

    FYI, the building is currently occupied by Carolina Academic Press--a publishing company--since the early 90s. The stucco has been there since at least 1970. A stucco repairman once commented that the method the stucco was put onto the building was very old fashioned and that the nails used looked like nails from the 40s, though I have no idea if this is accurate or not. My understanding is also that the stucco was put on (and probably also onto the church) because the bricks were pretty low quality, and there were structural issues, but again, I am not sure.

    Have also heard that over the years the building housed a music club (in the 40s), a butcher, a hair salon, a restaurant, a real estate development agency, and many other businesses!

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Last updated

  • Wed, 01/02/2013 - 2:45pm by gary

Location

35° 59' 11.0148" N, 78° 53' 50.6148" W

Comments

618
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
early 1920s
/ Demolished in
~1967-1971
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 

 


618 Fayetteville, 1962.
(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)

618 Fayetteville was built in the early 1920s as the Hayti Drug Store; by 1941, it had became the Hayti Grocery Store. A series of uses followed: Edith's Beauty Salon in the late 1940s, Trixie's Sport Shop and The Square Club in the mid-1950s, Pee Wee's Shoe Shop in 1959, Simply "Sport Shop/Shoe Shiner" in 1961, Johnnie's in the mid-1960s, and the John E. Payne Real Estate Company in 1968.


618 Fayetteville, late 1960s.
(Courtesy Durham County Library / North Carolina Collection)


Looking southwest on S. Elm towards the intersection of Fayetteville, S. Elm, and Whitted, 01.05.67.
(Courtesy The Herald-Sun Newspaper)

The building was torn down prior to 1972. The site has been occupied by the back of a single-story medical office complex since the early 1980s.


Site of 618 Fayetteville, 10.05.08. Although I bemoan the loss of historic architecture in general, I run across certain buildings that I actually miss, oddly enough, given that I never had the chance to see them. This is one of those.

(A bit of a departure of a link here: I've got an
in-progress post that is an overview on Hayti, including my various overview maps/aerials; I'm going to be linking to it as a geographic reference and updating it as I have the opportunity. Enjoy the Zoomify Aerial of Hayti.)

Find this spot on a Google Map.

35.986400 -78.897400

Comments

I know what you mean about missing buildings you've never seen. I feel the same way about Union Station.

Anyone know the story on 4004 Fayetteville? I see it wears the green "condemned" sticker -- nothing especially noteworthy about its design, though I happen to love it. 'Twould be a shame to see it demolished to make way for a larger intersection with Cornwallis.

Allison,

I don't know the story on this historic house, but it appears that it may be heir property from looking at the tax records (http://www.ustaxdata.com/nc/durham/building.cfm?ownerID=0204545%20%20%20...).

If you are interested contact the Neighborhood Improvement Services Department about this house. 560-1647. David Jones is the inspector for this case. He was unavailable when I called.

I would suspect this house is likely to be demolished unless someone steps up to buy it or there is a concerted effort to express concern over the existing demolition policy.

Hello, love the blog.

Was curious if you had any photos of the Fitzgerald business building on the corner of Kent and Chapel Hill--700 kent st today. (I found one partial from the 1920s on your site). Also if you knew the exact date it was built? I had heard "1890s" though it's possible that was just when the Fitzgerald business was most active, since I think you mention 1910?

FYI, the building is currently occupied by Carolina Academic Press--a publishing company--since the early 90s. The stucco has been there since at least 1970. A stucco repairman once commented that the method the stucco was put onto the building was very old fashioned and that the nails used looked like nails from the 40s, though I have no idea if this is accurate or not. My understanding is also that the stucco was put on (and probably also onto the church) because the bricks were pretty low quality, and there were structural issues, but again, I am not sure.

Have also heard that over the years the building housed a music club (in the 40s), a butcher, a hair salon, a restaurant, a real estate development agency, and many other businesses!

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