401 PINE / SOUTH ROXBORO - WM. AMEY FUNERAL HOME

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401 PINE / SOUTH ROXBORO - WM. AMEY FUNERAL HOME

401
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
~late 1890s
/ Demolished in
early 1970s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

Comments

  • Submitted by Jon on Thursday, August 28, 2008 - 11:40am

    I love houses with turrets. Beautiful house.

    Is that real brick installed over the wood siding? Or is it (most likely) that "brick" looking ashpalt shingle siding? Can you tell?

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 28, 2008 - 3:22pm

    It looks like the faux-brick ashpahlt roll or shingle siding to me...

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Thursday, August 28, 2008 - 7:14pm

    It was, in fact, the asphalt roll siding used so much in the forties and fifties. I remember passing the place on the way to church Sunday mornings, and there was hardly a time that the front porch was not full of people. It realy was a neat house, though.

  • Submitted by Anonymous on Friday, December 17, 2010 - 10:03pm

    THE PINE STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH LATER BECAME THE HOUSE OF PRAYER FOR ALL PEOPLE WHICH IS NOW LOCATED AT HOLLOWAY AND OAKWOOD

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Last updated

  • Tue, 07/26/2011 - 10:20pm by gary

Comments

401
,
Durham
NC
Cross street: 
Built in
~late 1890s
/ Demolished in
early 1970s
Construction type: 
Neighborhood: 
Type: 
Use: 

 


401 Pine Street, 1922.
(Courtesy Duke Rare Book and Manuscript Collection / Digital Durham)

The house at 401 Pine St. was built by Sidney T. James, who owned and operated the Bull City Drug Store on Fayetteville St. In 1933, though, William A. Amey and Emanuel G. Spaulding (CC Spaulding's younger brother) had established the Carolina Funeral Home in the house.


(From "Images of America: Durham" by Steve Massengill)

EG Spaulding moved away to New York, and Amey changed the name of the business to the William Amey Funeral Home. Amey was a "Mason and an Elk, Treasurer of the Mt. Vernon Credit Union, member of the Durham Business and Professional Chain, Odd Fellows, NAACP, and trustee of Mt. Vernon Baptist Church." His wife Essie ran a florist business out of the same building.


William Amey Funeral Home, 1949 (Still frame from "Negro Durham Marches On")
(Courtesy Durham County Library)


William Amey Funeral Home, 1949 (Still frame from "Negro Durham Marches On")
(Courtesy Durham County Library)

Below, the relevant clip from "Negro Durham Marches On" - 1949

(Courtesy Durham County Library)


(Courtesy Durham County Library)

By 1951, William Amey, Jr. had joined his father in the business.


Partial view of the Amey Funeral home, looking northeast, circa 1970.
(Courtesy Durham County Library)

In 1971, Amey moved the funeral home to 2919 Fayetteville St. and operated the business there until his death in 1981. The building at 401 S. Roxboro was demolished by the city of Durham using urban renewal funds in the early 1970s.


Looking northeast at the former site of the William Amey Funeral Home. the intersection of Poplar and S. Roxboro would have been at the driveway to the left. This portion of Dillard St., ahead and to the right, was created after urban renewal.

35.991149,-78.899997

Comments

I love houses with turrets. Beautiful house.

Is that real brick installed over the wood siding? Or is it (most likely) that "brick" looking ashpalt shingle siding? Can you tell?

It looks like the faux-brick ashpahlt roll or shingle siding to me...

It was, in fact, the asphalt roll siding used so much in the forties and fifties. I remember passing the place on the way to church Sunday mornings, and there was hardly a time that the front porch was not full of people. It realy was a neat house, though.

THE PINE STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH LATER BECAME THE HOUSE OF PRAYER FOR ALL PEOPLE WHICH IS NOW LOCATED AT HOLLOWAY AND OAKWOOD

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